(adsbygoogle = window.adsbygoogle || []).push({});

Traditional British Shopping Tour at London's Old St James

 

Traditional British Shopping Tour at London's Old St James


 If you're looking for the quintessential British shopping experience in London, the choice of where to start can be overwhelming. From one end of Oxford Street to the other, you can discover all the high street shops in the country. If designer brands are calling you,  take the first taxi to Knightsbridge. However, if that's authenticity you're looking for, then limit yourself to London's busiest historic shopping district, i.e. St James. 

 

 Since Charles II authorized construction around  St James' Royal Palace in the 17th century, the area has become one of London's greatest, a magnet for fashion and society. upper class. A surprising number of stores have remained unchanged since those days. 

 

 Surrounding this square pattern of old streets in London's SW1 postcode are some of Britain's most authentic retailers. These stores are one of the great success stories of British retail that have stood the test of time,  more than a century since their inception. member of the royal family. The issue of Royal Appointments to retailers that supply  Royal household appliances is a strong benchmark, indicating a consistent level of quality and service delivered over a multi-year period. You'll find that 'dates' are pretty much the norm for merchants in St James Street, Jermyn, and Princes Street  and 

 Piccadilly Arcades, both of which connect Jermyn Street to Piccadilly. Located near the red-brick Tudor-style St James's Palace complex giving the area a new royal boost, it is the official residence of the Prince of Wales and  Duchess of Wales. Cornwall in London. 

 

 Many international brands are here, but in London, you really have to look for quality products exclusively sourced from the UK, so keep an eye out for clothing and accessory vendors as well as British food and toiletries. You can spot some of the most glamorous and popular shops if you walk around. 

 

 At the end of St James's Street, Berry Brothers & Rudd, Britain's oldest liquor store, Lock & Co, and the famous hatmaker and shoemaker John Lobb, all lined up. Go higher, and admire the historical site D.R. Harris before traveling along Jermyn Street to Floris, Britain's oldest perfume and toiletries retailer, and Paxton & Whitfield, Britain's oldest cheese maker. Head to Cordings on Piccadilly to dress up his and hers in traditional country clothes and return through Charbonnel and Walker for luxurious handcrafted chocolates before browsing Hatchards, London's oldest bookstore and finally stroll through the well-dressed department store, Fortnum & Mason.

Comments



Font Size
+
16
-
lines height
+
2
-